Security planning

project: William Godwin's Diary

The project provides a digital edition of the diary of William Godwin (1756-1836). Godwin’s diary consists of 32 octavo notebooks. The first entry is for 6 April 1788 and the final entry is for 26 March 1836, shortly before he died. The diary is a resource of immense importance to researchers of history, politics, literature, and women’s studies. [read more]

project: Buried treasure: rediscovering the Lord Chamberlain's collection of plays

The project began upon the long-overdue cataloguing of the Lord Chamberlain's collection from 1852 onwards. The pilot covered the decade to 1863. The collection for that period numbers about 3000 plays, including for example the British versions of Uncle Tom's Cabin and many farces and pantomimes with political implications around issues such as first-wave feminism. Cultured mid-Victorians agreed with G. H. Lewes that 'drama is extinct as literature' and ignored the new performance culture; these plays have therefore never been considered in either literary or social histories. [read more]

project: The Listening Gallery: Integrating Music with Exhibitions and Gallery Displays, Medieval to Baroque

The Listening Gallery was a knowledge transfer collaboration between the Royal College of Music (RCM) and the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A). Stemming from research in music, art, design, and technology, the project connected objects in the V&A's collections with music that shares their rich and distinctive pasts. [read more]

project: Magnetic moments in the past: Developing archaeomagnetic dating for application in UK archaeology

This project follows on from a previous collaboration which established a methodology for using measurements of the past magnetic field of the Earth for dating archaeological materials in the last 4000 years in the UK. The primary aim of this project is to realise the potential of this research by developing its practical application in UK archaeology. There is increasing interest in using archaeomagnetic dating as part of the suite of chronological tools available to archaeologists. However, it has yet to be adopted routinely. [read more]

project: Capturing the past, preserving the future: digitisation of the national review of live art video collection

The Capturing the Past, Preserving the Future project has the following aims: To preserve for posterity the unique research materials contained in the National Review of Live Art Video Archive by digitising and maintaining the entire collection; To create an interactive and searchable on-line catalogue, including selected copyright-cleared examples of its holdings; To promote the enhanced research facility amongst the UK higher education, national and international performance research and practitioner communities; Readiness for developing curated programmes. [read more]

project: The Prehistoric Stones of Greece: a resource from field-survey

The Prehistoric Stones of Greece (SOG) set out to enhance the research value of survey projects conducted in Greece that had recovered Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic materials. SOG’s focus was to establish a database of stone tools and prehistoric lithics generally and by drawing this material into a common format enhance the resource for a variety of archaeological purposes; in particular academic research and heritage management. [read more]

project: The Letters of Bess of Hardwick

Elizabeth, countess of Shrewsbury (c.1522-1608), known as ‘Bess of Hardwick’, is one of Elizabethan England most famous figures. She is renowned for her reputation as an indomitable matriarch and dynast and perhaps best known as the builder of great stately homes like the magnificent Hardwick Hall and Chatsworth House. The story of her life as told to date takes little account of her more than 230 letters. The aim of the project is to make these letters accessible by producing a searchable, interactive online edition of all ca. [read more]

project: The electronic Old Bailey Sessions proceedings, c.1670-1778

The aim was to make available in a fully searchable form, the full text of the Proceedings of the Old Bailey, 1674 to 1834, in combination with original page images. The Proceedings and the website contain 25 million words of transcripts of approximately 100,000 felony trials held at the Old Bailey between 1674 and 1834. This text has been transcribed and marked up to allow both free text searching, and structured analysis using bespoke statistical tools. [read more]

project: Archaeotools: Data mining, facetted classification and E-archaeology

This two year project built upon previous ADS work to develop tools (the Common Information Environment - Archaeobrowser project) using advanced data mining and knowledge capture technologies to allow archaeologists to discover, share and analyse datasets and legacy publications that had hitherto been very difficult to integrate into digital frameworks. The project had three interrelated objectives, each represented by a distinct workpackage. [read more]

project: 1641 Depositions

The aim of this three-year project (2007-2010) is to transcribe and digitise the ‘1641 Depositions’, a unique historical source housed in the TCD Library, The collection comprises some 3,100 personal statements, in which mainly protestant men and women of all classes told of their experiences at the outbreak of the rebellion by the catholic Irish in 1641. This material, collected by government-appointed commissioners over the course of a decade, runs to approximately 19,000 pages. [read more]

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