GPS and total station surveys

project: 'Remembering': Victims, Survivors and Commemoration in Post-conflict Northern Ireland

This section within the CAIN Web site (cain.ulster.ac.uk) contains an extensive on-line digital Archive of source materials and information on the topics of victims, survivors and commemoration in Northern Ireland. Information contained in the Archive helps to document the process by which society in Northern Ireland has so far addressed these complex issues and will be of interest not only to an academic audience but also to policy makers, non-governmental organisations, community leaders and others. [read more]

project: Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC)

The Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilization (DARMC) makes freely available on the internet the best available materials for a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) approach to mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds. DARMC allows innovative spatial and temporal analyses of all aspects of the civilizations of western Eurasia in the first 1500 years of our era, as well as the generation of original maps illustrating differing aspects of ancient and medieval civilization. [read more]

project: Mapping Medieval Chester

The project asks questions about Chester as a city on the (often troubled) border between England and Wales, and about how different medieval inhabitants imagined and represented the urban space around them. [read more]

project: Inscriptions of Roman Tripolitania

This is the republication of a volume of almost 1,000 inscriptions (almost all in Latin) of the Roman period from Tripolitania (Libya): the original volume was published in 1952, but with very little illustration, and very sketchy maps. This re-edition makes no alterations to the academic content. The new elements are that it includes photographs of almost all the texts, and it maps the data onto the map of Libya in Google Maps or Google Earth. [read more]

project: Inscriptions of Roman Cyrenaica (IRCyr)

The project aims to assemble an online corpus of all the material gathered by Prof Joyce Reynolds during her numerous visits to Libya. The project consists in the digitisation of some 2000 inscriptions from Roman Cyrenaica, nearly a third of which have never previously been published. The new corpus will be presented as a series of documents; but it will also link to an online map of Roman Cyrenaica, being prepared as part of the Pleiades project (http://www.unc.edu/awmc/pleiades.html). [read more]

Report on the Methods Network seminar run by Kate Devlin, Goldsmiths College, University of London (7 March 2007).

Computer graphics has become a popular way of interpreting past environments, for educational and entertainment value, and also as an aid to research. The use of three-dimensional computer modelling to create an image of a site or artefact has become an accepted means of communicating cultural heritage information.

Report, abstracts and audio recordings from the Methods Network seminar, hosted by Mark Greengrass, Executive Director, Humanities Research Institute, Sheffield University.

This seminar brought together specialists in the application of ICT to the historical and archaeological domains. The programme focussed on three subjects: the past and virtual representation of place and time; the past and virtual representation of texts; the past and representation of objects and events.

project: Stonehenge Riverside Project

The Stonehenge Riverside Project was initiated in 2003 with the overall aim of better understanding Stonehenge within its changing monumental and natural landscape context, especially through investigation of the hypothesis that Stonehenge (in its Phase 3) formed one half of a larger complex as a stone circle associated with the dead, in contrast to a timber circle associated with the living at Durrington Walls. After five years of field investigations (landscape survey, geophysics, earthwork survey, excavation) and re-appraisal of previous interventions within the Stonehenge landscape, the [read more]

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